Friday, September 11, 2009

What to expect in a Yoga Class

I came across a blog post “11 Tips to Help You Feel at Ease at Your First Yoga Class” in The Weekly Spark newsletter from Stepfanie Romine who is a health and nutrition writer and I am reproducing some of the points from her blog which I find to very good information for new practitioners as well as seasoned practitioners.

Shoes
Yoga is practiced barefoot, so be prepared. There's no need to get a pedicure for the occasion, but give your feet a quick rinse before class, especially if they've been cooped up in closed-toe shoes all day. You spend a great deal of time focusing on gripping your feet, spreading your toes and evenly distributing your weight over your entire feet. Sweaty, dirty feet stick to yoga mats, and if you have lotion or cream on your feet, you can slip. You can read my post on Clean Face and Feet for Yoga to gain some insights. Wear whatever shoes you'd like to the class, but take your shoes off before entering the yoga room. Most studios have shelves for shoes either just inside the door or in the lobby.

Clothes
Comfort is important during a yoga class. You'll be spending a good deal of time bending, stretching and twisting your body, so you'll want to wear something that will stay put. You will want to avoid clothes that are so tight that they impede breathing or make it difficult to move. Shorts and loose shirts often move around and expose too much skin, while skintight running tights make it hard to move your body. Opt for cotton, lycra or sweat-absorbing microfiber fabrics. Longer sleeveless tops are a good choice, as are form-fitting pants or cropped pants. Ladies, wear a sports bra, as a regular bra will slip around too much during your practice and get those yoga tops which are padded. Read my post on What Not To Wear To A Yoga Class.

Talking
Yoga is a quiet, contemplative activity, and students are discouraged from talking throughout the class. The teacher will describe the l transition from pose to pose and offer encouragement throughout. In addition, you might hear long, complicated-sounding names like Adho Mukha Svanasana (downward-facing dog) and Virabhadrasana (warrior). Teachers often include the traditional Sanskrit names of poses, but most beginner classes will use the English names. In addition, you might hear the words drishti (gaze), bandhas (energy locks), asanas (poses), among other Sanskrit words. If there is a word you don't understand, feel free to ask the teacher about it after class. Or if you too shy or not sure what questions to ask, you can visit Yoga Journal website as it provides a good source of reference for everything you need to know about yoga.

Time
A yoga class often begins with a few minutes of relaxation and meditation to prepare your mind and body for your practice. This might be in the form of deep breathing, a chant of "om" or some visualization exercises. So that you don't miss this important aspect or disturb others who are trying to focus, try to come to class about five or 10 minutes early. You can chat with the teacher, warm up with a few stretches (though you will warm up during class) and get settled on your mat. If you are late for the class, please try not to disrupt the class too much by fumbling around and try not to be so late that you can't get warmed-up before diving into the deeper poses. Some teachers do not allow latecomers to join the class if the class has already started for more than 15 minutes.

Yoga classes last between 45 and 90 minutes. Most beginner classes are shorter, while advanced classes are longer.

Breathing
As with any physical activity, the breath is very important in yoga. The first time you hear people breathing during yoga, you might think that a snake is loose in the room. The traditional breath, called "ujjayi" breath, is slow and even inhales and exhales through the nose. The back of the throat is constricted slightly to create a filter for the breath and generate heat. The audible breath is used as a "moving meditation" throughout the practice. Focusing on the sound and cadence of the breath helps calm your mind, especially during more difficult poses.

When you encounter a pose that is challenging, focus on your breath and imagine breathing into the part of your body that feels discomfort. It will help you build endurance. Breathing awareness is one of the most simple ways to calm and integrate the mind and body. You can practice slow deep breathing when you are working at the computer or when you are driving (especially when you are stuck in a traffic jam), it will help to foster a relaxed and focused state of mind.

Movement
While there are a variety of different philosophies and styles of yoga, classes can be broken into two basic groups: hatha and vinyasa.

If you are attending your first yoga class it is advisable to check to see if it is a beginners class as the teacher will go through the basic postures, providing guidance for correct alignment and breathing technique.

After you have attended a few classes, you can try out the hatha class which a gentle form of yoga as there will be breaks between poses. You will return to a neutral, restorative seated or standing pose between more difficult poses.

Vinyasa means flow, which indicates that a class will have fewer resting poses. You will transition from pose to pose, with no actual rest. Each pose will be held for a certain amount of time (5-8 breaths is common) before you move on to another pose, often using a series of movements called sun salutations to transition.

If you ever need a break during the class, you can take child's pose, which is a restorative pose. Kneel on the floor, spreading your legs if need be, sit your hips onto your heels and extend your arms either overhead to stretch the length of the back or alongside the hips, to stretch across the top of the back.

Music
Many contemporary yoga classes are accompanied by music. Some teachers might choose Sanskrit chants as their soundtrack of choice, while others might choose hits from the radio. Music is not played during more traditional yoga classes, when students are encouraged to listen to and focus on their breath.

Chanting
Many teachers begin and end yoga classes with a chant, most commonly "Om." Feel free to join in the chant or listen quietly until you feel comfortable. This is another way you start to quiet and focus the mind during a yoga class.

Touching
Yoga teachers are trained to adjust students to keep them in proper alignment, help them go deeper into a pose and try out a pose they might not feel strong enough to attempt on their own. Don't be surprised if your yoga teacher is more "hands on" than other fitness instructors you've encountered. Teachers are usually pretty good at gauging a student's willingness to be assisted/touched. If you feel uncomfortable with hands-on adjustments, feel free to let your teacher know.

Water
There are no designated water breaks during class, and traditionally students are discouraged from drinking during class as it extinguishes the "fire" you're trying to create through your breath and movement. You might notice many students never stop to take a drink and others stop to towel off and get a drink periodically. Bringing a water bottle to class is acceptable, and drink as much and as often as you need, especially during hot yoga classes.

Injuries

Normally, before the start of the class, the teacher will ask if any of the practitioners has any injuries. Do let the teacher know if you have any existing or previous injuries as he or she will provide alternative poses or use yoga props to help you in the pose. Some teachers structure the class to incorporate poses to help relieve the pain as there are many yoga poses that can help to relieve muscle and joint pain and increase flexibility.

Rest
At the end of each yoga class, there is a time for rest and reflection. Teachers might lead a chant or guided meditation, and they will encourage you to relax your mind and focus your attention. It's tradition to sit in a crossed-leg position with your feet on top of the legs (lotus pose), but find a position that makes you feel comfortable.

(While you might feel like your "workout" is over, you should stick around for the final relaxation poses. If you need to leave class a few minutes early for whatever reason, notify your teacher before class and leave before Savasana begins.)

Eventually, you will make your way to your back, arms and legs resting comfortably at your sides and your palms facing up. You'll close your eyes and focus on relaxing. Try to lie still and clear your mind. This pose, called Savanasa or corpse pose, is a very important part of any yoga practice, as it allows the body to rest and rejuvenate itself. When it's time to come out of Savasana, your teacher will quietly tell you to wiggle your fingers and toes.

Make small movements, then roll onto your right side in a fetal position, keeping your eyes closed. Return to a cross-legged seated position, then listen to your teacher's final instructions.

Traditionally, the hands are brought to the heart in a prayer position, then brought between the eyebrows and finally overhead. Bow your head to the floor, keeping hands in prayer just in front of you. You'll hear your teacher say "Namaste," and you repeat it back. "Namaste" means "may the light within me honor the light within you”.

I hope the above will help to clear away some of your fears about joining a yoga class as yoga offers a lot of benefits to help you to be more healthier, happier and peaceful.

"The most important pieces of equipment you need for doing yoga are your body and your mind." ~ Rodney Yee

1 comment:

karim said...

Very thoughtfull post on wellness. It should be very much helpfull

Thanks,
Karim - Creating Power